A Nor'easter Is Coming For The Northeast, From Pennsylvania To Maine | Old North State Wealth News
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A nor’easter is coming for the Northeast, from Pennsylvania to Maine

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A mix of snow, rain and gusty winds is expected to blanket the Northeast between Monday and Tuesday.

Weather Prediction Center/NOAA

A winter storm is expected to barrel through the Northeast leading up to Valentine’s Day.

Up to a foot of snow is forecast in parts of Pennsylvania and upstate New York, according to the National Weather Service. Meanwhile, an intense rain storm poses the risk of coastal flooding along New Jersey and Long Island.

The brunt of the nor’easter will appear Monday evening and stretch into Tuesday morning. By then, the storm is expected to reach the New England region.

Despite the forecast of snow and rain, forecasters says it will be relatively warm across the eastern U.S. compared to previous weeks given the lack of cold air coming from Canada.

Up to a foot of snow and coastal flooding in Pennsylvania

Carbon and Monroe counties in eastern Pennsylvania are expected to receive some of the most snow in the state, with up to 12 inches.

Meanwhile, parts of central Pennsylvania, including State College, are forecast to receive half a foot of snow and possibly more. A winter storm watch is in effect from Monday evening through Tuesday afternoon. During that time, snow is expected to fall more than an inch per hour. The NWS said the most intense snowfall will take place Tuesday morning.

Meanwhile, further southeast near Philadelphia and Camden, N.J., there is a potential for minor coastal flooding starting Sunday into Tuesday. The NWS said to prepare for partial or full road closures.

Coastal flooding is forecast to pose an even larger threat near Atlantic City to Perth Amboy in New Jersey, especially on Tuesday with an intense rainstorm expected to pass through.

Lots of wet snow in New York City and Long Island

In upstate New York, including Binghamton and Ithaca, more than 7 inches of snow is expected to accumulate over the next few days. On Monday, snow is forecast to fall 2 to 3 inches per hour.

Further south of Binghamton, in counties like Monticello, the snow will be even harsher with up to a foot of snow possibly appearing Monday evening. Meanwhile north of Binghamton, like in Syracuse, the snowfall is expected to be light — with less than an inch forecast to accumulate.

In New York City, rain and wet snow is in store early this week. The boroughs and Long Island are expected to receive less than 2 inches of snow on Monday night into Tuesday.

The bigger concern is coastal flooding in Long Island’s South Shore. Parking lots, parks and buildings with basements near the waterfront are especially vulnerable, the NWS said.

Gusty winds and heavy snow will disrupt travel in New England

Early this week, parts of northern Connecticut, northern Rhode Island and most of Massachusetts are forecast for intense snow between 4 and 8 inches and wind gusts as high as 40 miles per hour.

A winter storm watch will be in effect in cities like Hartford and Putnam in Connecticut; Providence in Rhode Island; and Boston and Amherst in Massachusetts. The NWS said to be especially careful while traveling, given the harsh weather conditions.

The winter storm will also impact a small tip of southwest Maine and southern New Hampshire. More than 6 inches of snow may fall in areas like Sanford and Dover in Maine and Concord and Manchester in New Hampshire.



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